Fleetwood – 1980 – Community Welfare

The first day of issue was 11 AUG 1980. There are 5 covers for this series (4 singles + 1 full set):


22c Life Be In It

“From the village square to the Olympic stadium, and all around the world, sports offer exercise for body and mind. And, at the same time, they help bring life to its fullest potential for each individual. As nations come together to provide good nutrition and a healthy way of life for their citizens, they begin to produce individuals and teams capable of competing at all levels, and they add as well to the simple joy of living. By encouraging sports as a way of feeling good — through better health and individual accomplishment — nations increase the standard of living of their citizens. For, whether bicycling through the city park or running in a Marathon, people find that sports are a good way to better health and fitness, and to a happier life. With a diversity as wide as the imagination, sports offer each individual an opportunity to enjoy life in a new way — a healthier way. Adults at work … children at school … and families within a community all will benefit from active sports, and everyone can become a messenger for health and happiness.”


22c Meals on Wheels

“Today’s Elderly Nutrition Programs in the United States trace their roots back to Great Britain during World War II. During the Blitz, when German planes bombed English soil, many people lost their homes and, subsequently, their ability to cook meals for themselves. The Women’s Volunteer Service for Civil Defense responded to this emergency by preparing and delivering meals to their disadvantaged neighbors. These women also brought refreshments in canteens to servicemen during World War II. The canteens came to be known as “Meals on Wheels.” Thus, the first organized nutrition program was born. Following the war, the U.S. embarked on its own experimental meal program. What began as a single small program serving seven seniors has grown into hundreds of local home-delivered and congregate meal programs that serve millions of elderly, disabled, or at-risk persons across the country. The main goal of nutrition programs is to feed seniors in need, the programs provide elderly Americans with much more than just meals. Congregate meal sites give seniors the opportunity to socialize with members of the surrounding community, while Meals On Wheels programs, armed with an array of cheerful and caring volunteers, deliver meals to frail, sick, home-bound seniors-only 46% of whom reported getting out of their homes at least once per week. And for the 57% of congregate and 60% of Meals On Wheels recipients who live alone, nutrition programs not only provide them with nutritious meals but also friends.”


22c Salvation Army

“William Booth of Great Britain, the father and first General of the Salvation Army once said, “My comrades, soul-saving is our avocation, the great purpose and business of our lives. Let us seek first the kingdom of God, let us be SALVATIONISTS indeed.” In his goal to, “make religion where there was no religion before,” Booth’s war against evil quickly spread from Britain to all parts of the world, including Canada when, in 1882, English immigrants Jack Addie and Joe Ludgate carried the battle line to the streets of London, Ontario. These youthful enthusiasts, formerly associated with the Salvation Army in Great Britain, met by chance at a Methodist prayer meeting and resolved to promote Christianity to Canadian men and women untouched by ordinary religious efforts. Following Booth’s guidelines, the Canada Salvation Army was founded as primarily a religious movement. It was composed of men and women dedicated to the task of uplifting their fellows through the Gospel of Christ, regardless of class, creed or color … everyone is a “brother for whom Christ died.” The Army grew beyond all expectation, and with this growth grew the list of services available to the needy. These services today include: dispensaries and medical services, children’s homes and nurseries, alcoholics’ clinics, employment counseling, repair centers, crime prevention work, disaster relief, visitation of hospitals and institutions, accommodation for homeless persons, and a multitude of other fine services.”


22c St Vincent de Paul Society

“The Society of St. Vincent de Paul’s purposes are to offer tangible assistance to those in need on a person to person basis and to offer spiritual services; this makes the Society unique in its role as a charitable organization. A key strength of the Society is in the personalized delivery of help. This aid may take the form of intervention, consultation or often through direct dollar or in-kind service. An essential precept of the Society’s work is to provide help while conscientiously maintaining the privacy and dignity of those that are served. The Society recognizes that it must assume, also, a role of advocacy for those who are defenseless or voiceless. Some of the services the Society does is providing home and hospital visits to the poor, sick, elderly and physically challenged; providing Thrift Stores, Food Pantries and Soup Kitchens; visiting local, state and federal prisons; person-to-person counseling; providing financial aid to individuals in emergency situations for utilities, housing, medication, household items, etc.; disaster relief and recovery assistance for victims of natural disasters in the U.S. and other countries. The Council of the United States of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul is primarily supported financially through what is called “Solidarity Contributions,” from its local conference units. It also receives donations and bequests.”


Set of 5 stamps / “Community Welfare” (cachet)

“From the village square to the Olympic stadium, and all around the world, sports offer exercise for body and mind. And, at the same time, they help bring life to its fullest potential for each individual. As nations come together to provide good nutrition and a healthy way of life for their citizens, they begin to produce individuals and teams capable of competing at all levels, and they add as well to the simple joy of living. By encouraging sports as a way of feeling good — through better health and individual accomplishment — nations increase the standard of living of their citizens. For, whether bicycling through the city park or running in a Marathon, people find that sports are a good way to better health and fitness, and to a happier life. With a diversity as wide as the imagination, sports offer each individual an opportunity to enjoy life in a new way — a healthier way. Adults at work … children at school … and families within a community all will benefit from active sports, and everyone can become a messenger for health and happiness.”

Some more information about the artist John Spachurst from the Unicover website:

John Spachurst
British 1938 –

Born in 1938, John Spatchurst was trained at the Ravensbourne College of Art, United Kingdom, where he earned a national diploma in design. After receiving his degree, Spatchurst spent four years working for Masius-Wynne-Williams advertising agency in London. In 1963 he joined ABC television as a graphic designer and later worked as a set designer in Australia. By 1973 Spatchurst had acquired extensive experience enabling him to become a freelance designer. Spatchurst’s work is impressive and his expertise extends to architectural graphics, environmental design, exhibition design, corporate identity, publications, annual reports and packaging. His work has appeared in various publications, and he has served as a member of the Associate of the Industrial Design Institute of Australia and the Australian Government Stamp Advisory Committee.